Safe to say that most travellers are open to any tips on which places are actually worth visiting while they go roaming through European cities. We have selected some of Prague’s historical sites and split them up into groups according to their location, making travelling from one place to another within each group easy and as quick as possible.
In the heart of Europe, Prague castle is the undisputed number one ‘point-of-interest’. Prague castle was the place of residence for Czech rulers (also the home of two Roman Emperors long ago) with a history reaching back a thousand years. Behind its gates you will be able to enjoy sites such as the Cathedral of Saints Vitus, Wenceslaus and Adalbert, the Old Royal Palace and the multicoloured Golden Lane with its tiny houses.
If you should find yourself, after your tour of the castle, heading down the Old Castle Stairs to the Malostranská metro station, you will come across an inconspicuous gate near to the metro's entrance which will lead you to Waldstein garden, where you will be greeted by a fairytale like royal garden with an opulent palace standing out above the beauty. But remember - the gardens are only open during the summer season, meaning until the 31st of October.
Petřín is known by the locals as a place for lovers, but it doubles as a place for fun and interesting experiences for groups of friends or families with children as well, all of which is mostly made possible thanks to the cable car, planetarium, observation tower (which bears a striking resemblance to Paris's Eiffel Tower) and the maze of mirrors. From here you can then enjoy a pleasant walk down to the Strahov Abbey. Strahov is one of the oldest Premonstratensian abbeys in the Czech Republic dating back to the 12th century. Also, a very valuable library with gorgeous, richly designed halls is hidden within the abbey's interior.
When you finish here, head out to the courtyard, then through the baroque gate to a place called Pohořelec. Once you arrive, you can walk down to Prague Castle, but you shouldn’t skip out on two other noteworthy sites; the magnificent Czernin Palace and Prague's Loreto Sanctuary. And if you pay good attention, you might even be able to pick out the “artificial window” at Loretánské náměstí (Loretánské Square) on one of the many historical houses. The “window” has been drawn onto one of the walls to look suspiciously similar to the real windows around it. The Old Town Square along with Prague Castle falls into the category of “must-sees” for any visit to Prague. Its most dominate feature is the Old Town Hall, which you really shouldn’t miss out on, and not just because of its famous astronomical clock with its procession of apostles. Also, St. Nicholas’ Church, the Church of Our Lady before Týn, and the Stone Bell House are all worth a visit.
After taking a tour of the Old Town Square, head on down Pařížská street to the Old Jewish District - Josefov. The local synagogues and the Old Jewish Cemetery, which is part of the Jewish Museum in Prague, truly provide for a one-of-a-kind atmosphere. Also, be sure not skip out on a good lunch - a restaurant in Prague 1, right in the heart of the city, offering excellent dishes of classic Czech cuisine made in a new and creative way. And due to the location of all the historical sites we've mentioned above, we would recommend a reservation at a hotel in The Old Town Prague.